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Mediabox[Edit]
Technical Data[Edit]
Capital Tripolis
Political Structure 48 Entities
Population 6173000
Urban Population 85%
Population Growth 2.0%
Income per Capita 11630$ / Year
Literacy Rate 85.0%
Languages Arabic
AreaSetup Travel112 1759540 km²
Time Zone UTC/GMT +2.00
AltitudeSetup Travel112 ~ 407 m
Currency LYD (Dinar)
Country Code LY
Neighbours TD, NE, DZ, SD, TN, EG
Vehicle Registration Code LA (Unofficial)
Top-Level Domain .ly
External Links[Edit]
Government (ar)
gpco.gov.ly
Ministry for Foreign Affairs (ar)
www.foreign.gov.ly
Travel Guide
www.lonelyplanet.com
Encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org
independent political entity

Libya

Local Time: Setup Travel112Helptext

News and Warnings

Safety

Publisher: U.S. Department of StateSetup Travel112Helptext
Last Update: 2010-01-07
>>Please apologize, but we havn't found any information on the publisher's website<<
[1] 

Emergency

Telephone Numbers

Police Fire Brigade Ambulance Mobile Phone (GSM)
193 193 193 112

Embassies and Consulates

Attention: As a citizen of the European Union, you can use the embassies and consulates of the other member states as well. You will find the list of represented EU states on our webpage Embassies and Consulates.


Libya => Foreign CountriesSetup Travel112
Entries: 0
Foreign CountriesSetup Travel112 => Libya
Entries: 3

Card Service

Company
American Express Diners Club Discover EC/Maestro JCB MasterCard Visa

Money Transfer

Western Union[2]  and other companies are offering a worldwide service, to send money to friends or relatives within minutes to nearly every location in the world. Per location the stored agents will be shown. You can find the agents on the map also, as long a road map is available.
Alternatively you can send money online also, but this service is only from some countries[3]  available.


WeatherSetup Travel112


Average Values


Transport

Traffic Rules

Right-Hand Traffic
If right-hand-traffic is unusal for you, take time and make breaks to become used to. Always bear in mind that you have to drive on the right side!
 
Right-Hand Traffic
Right-Hand Traffic

Health

Health Information

Publisher: U.S.A., Centers for Disease Control and PreventionSetup Travel112Helptext
Last Update: 2010-01-07

    Before visiting Libya, you may need to get the following vaccinations and medications for vaccine-preventable diseases and other diseases you might be at risk for at your destination: (Note: Your doctor or health-care provider will determine what you will need, depending on factors such as your health and immunization history, areas of the country you will be visiting, and planned activities.)

    To have the most benefit, see a health-care provider at least 4–6 weeks before your trip to allow time for your vaccines to take effect.

    Even if you have less than 4 weeks before you leave, you should still see a health-care provider for needed vaccines and other medications and information about how to protect yourself from illness and injury while traveling.

    CDC recommends that you see a health-care provider who specializes in Travel Medicine.  Find a travel medicine clinic near you. If you have a medical condition, you should also share your travel plans with any doctors you are currently seeing for other medical reasons.

    If your travel plans will take you to more than one country during a single trip, be sure to let your health-care provider know so that you can receive the appropriate vaccinations and information for all of your destinations. Long-term travelers, such as those who plan to work or study abroad, may also need additional vaccinations as required by their employer or school.

    Although yellow fever is not a disease risk in Libya, the government requires travelers arriving from countries where yellow fever is present to present proof of yellow fever vaccination. If you will be traveling to one of these countries where yellow fever is present before arriving in Libya, this requirement must be taken into consideration.

    Be sure your routine vaccinations are up-to-date. Check the links below to see which vaccinations adults and children should get.

    Routine vaccines, as they are often called, such as for influenza, chickenpox (or varicella), polio, measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), and diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT) are given at all stages of life; see the childhood and adolescent immunization schedule and routine adult immunization schedule.

    Routine vaccines are recommended even if you do not travel. Although childhood diseases, such as measles, rarely occur in the United States, they are still common in many parts of the world. A traveler who is not vaccinated would be at risk for infection.

    [4] 

    Health Factors[5] 

    Description
    Water Access to improved drinking water sources: rural 68%
    Access to improved drinking water sources: urban 72%
    Sanitation Access to improved sanitation: rural 96%
    Access to improved sanitation: urban 97%
    Health Physicians density (per 10 000 population) 13.0
    Hospital beds (per 10 000 population) 37
    Life expectancy at birth (years) female 75
    Life expectancy at birth (years) male 70

    Natural Disaster

    Earthquake

    In the last 200 years significant earthquakes (Quantity: 1) have occurred in Libya.
    more...

    The GSHAP Global Seismic Hazard Map
    This GSHAP map depicts the likely level of short-period ground motion from earthquakes in a fifty-year window. The map colors chosen to delineate the hazard roughly correspond to the actual level of the hazard. The cooler colors represent lower hazard while the warmer colors represent higher hazard. Specifically, white and green correspond to low hazard (0 - 8% g, where g equals the acceleration of gravity); yellow and orange correspond to moderate hazard (8 - 24% g); pink and red correspond to high hazard (24 - 40% g); and dark red and brown correspond to very high hazard ( ? 40% g).[6] 


    Earthquake: Libya

    GSHAP[7]

    Travel Preparation

    Entry and Exit Requirements

    Publisher: U.S. Department of StateSetup Travel112Helptext
    Last Update: 2010-01-07
      Passports and visas are required. The restrictions on the use of U.S. passports for travel to, in, or through Libya were lifted in February 2004. Please see the section below on Special Circumstances.

    The Libyan government announced a new biometric requirement for visa applicants that became effective on December 1, 2008.  This requirement necessitates personal appearance at a Libyan Embassy of all visa applicants. At present, this change affects only applicants for Libyan visas in London and Paris, but will likely expand to other Libyan embassies in the near future.  In addition, The Libyan government released a list of additional documents required for visa processing.  These documents are similar to those required from Libyan citizens for travel to many European countries, and include proof of insurance, a round-trip air ticket, and hotel reservations. American citizens seeking to travel to Libya should contact the Libyan embassy where they plan to apply to determine exact requirements.

    Without prior notice, the Libyan government on November 11, 2007 “reinstated” a requirement that all foreign travelers must have an Arabic translation of their personal biographic data added to their passport in order to apply for a Libyan visa, or to enter Libya. This requirement includes foreigners who already received visas before the requirement was put into place, including those foreigners currently resident in Libya. Since that date, foreign travelers whose passports do not have Arabic translations have been denied entry into Libya or refused boarding by airlines on flights into Libya.

    The U.S. passport is a U.S. travel document that meets all generally recognized international standards. While the Libyan government has the right to impose its own requirements for travelers in connection with obtaining a Libyan visa, it also has the responsibility to give travelers information on where and how to meet these requirements. Travelers should be aware that in some cases, Libyan officials may ask that U.S. citizens obtain translations from U.S. Government-approved translation services. However, U.S. consular officers have no authority to designate or certify private translations; nor do they have authority to place a consular authentication stamp over a privately-obtained translation.

    American citizens who hold Libyan visas or who intend to apply for a visa are advised to contact the nearest Libyan embassy or consulate for information on how to obtain an acceptable translation. Information from Libyan embassies and consulates may differ from country to country. American citizens may also contact the Consular Section at the U.S. embassy or consulate for additional information.

    The Government of Libya does not allow persons with passports bearing an Israeli visa or entry/exit stamps to enter the country. At this time, neither Libya nor the U.S. provides visa services to the general public in each other’s countries; U.S. visitors to Libya should therefore plan to obtain a visa via a third country. Libyan visas require an invitation or sponsor, can take up to several months to process, and should be obtained prior to travel. All visas are vetted and approved by immigration departments in Tripoli and only issued by the appropriate Libyan Embassy upon receipt of that approval. There may be another wait for actual visa issuance once approval has been received. For tourists, the visa application procedure in most cases requires a letter of invitation from an accredited tour company in Libya; for business travelers, a letter of invitation is needed from the Libyan business entity. Americans who apply for Libyan visas are experiencing significant delays, often waiting several weeks or months if their applications are approved at all. Inconsistent Libyan visa practice is subject to change without notice and visa service to American citizens is often blocked without warning. With few exceptions, Libya has stopped issuing tourist visas to Americans. It is recommended that Americans always obtain individual Libyan visas prior to travel, rather than group visas. Americans who expected to enter on group tour visas or individual airport visas arranged by Libyan sponsors have routinely been denied entry at the air and sea ports and have been forced to turn back at the airport or remain onboard ship at the port while other nationals disembark. The U.S. Embassy in Tripoli cannot provide assistance to American citizens seeking Libyan visas.

    Inquiries about obtaining a Libyan visa may be made through the Libyan Embassy in Washington, D.C. The Embassy is located at 2600 Virginia Avenue NW – Suite 705, Washington, DC 20037, phone number 202-944-9601, fax number 202-944-9606, website www.libyanbureau-dc.org. Neither the Libyan Mission to the UN in New York nor the Libyan Embassy in Washington, DC accepts visa applications from the general public. The closest Libyan visa-issuing office to the continental United States is the Libyan People’s Bureau in Ottawa, Canada; however, that office frequently declines to accept visa applications from American citizens. The land borders with Egypt and Tunisia are subject to periodic closures even to travelers with valid Libyan visas. Short-term closures of other land borders may occur with little notice. Within three days of arrival, visitors must register at the police station closest to where they are residing or they may encounter problems during their stay or upon departure.

    Women and children in Libya are often subject to strict family controls.  This can be a particular problem for young single women of marriageable age. Although a woman does not need her father’s or husband's explicit consent every time she wishes to leave Libya, a Libyan husband may take legal action to prevent his wife from leaving the country, regardless of her nationality. While not illegal, it is unusual for women and children to travel alone. Children under 18 whose fathers are Libyan must have the father's permission to depart Libya, even if the mother has been granted full custody by a Libyan court.

    The Libyan Government requires all its citizens, including dual nationals of Libyan descent, to enter and depart Libya on Libyan documents. In some cases American citizens of Libyan descent have entered Libya on old or expired Libyan identity document and then discovered that they cannot depart Libya without obtaining a valid Libyan passport, which can be a cumbersome process.

    Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site.  For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.

      Passports and visas are required. The restrictions on the use of U.S. passports for travel to, in, or through Libya were lifted in February 2004. Please see the section below on Special Circumstances.

    The Libyan government announced a new biometric requirement for visa applicants that became effective on December 1, 2008.  This requirement necessitates personal appearance at a Libyan Embassy of all visa applicants. At present, this change affects only applicants for Libyan visas in London and Paris, but will likely expand to other Libyan embassies in the near future.  In addition, The Libyan government released a list of additional documents required for visa processing.  These documents are similar to those required from Libyan citizens for travel to many European countries, and include proof of insurance, a round-trip air ticket, and hotel reservations. American citizens seeking to travel to Libya should contact the Libyan embassy where they plan to apply to determine exact requirements.

    Without prior notice, the Libyan government on November 11, 2007 “reinstated” a requirement that all foreign travelers must have an Arabic translation of their personal biographic data added to their passport in order to apply for a Libyan visa, or to enter Libya. This requirement includes foreigners who already received visas before the requirement was put into place, including those foreigners currently resident in Libya. Since that date, foreign travelers whose passports do not have Arabic translations have been denied entry into Libya or refused boarding by airlines on flights into Libya.

    The U.S. passport is a U.S. travel document that meets all generally recognized international standards. While the Libyan government has the right to impose its own requirements for travelers in connection with obtaining a Libyan visa, it also has the responsibility to give travelers information on where and how to meet these requirements. Travelers should be aware that in some cases, Libyan officials may ask that U.S. citizens obtain translations from U.S. Government-approved translation services. However, U.S. consular officers have no authority to designate or certify private translations; nor do they have authority to place a consular authentication stamp over a privately-obtained translation.

    American citizens who hold Libyan visas or who intend to apply for a visa are advised to contact the nearest Libyan embassy or consulate for information on how to obtain an acceptable translation. Information from Libyan embassies and consulates may differ from country to country. American citizens may also contact the Consular Section at the U.S. embassy or consulate for additional information.

    The Government of Libya does not allow persons with passports bearing an Israeli visa or entry/exit stamps to enter the country. At this time, neither Libya nor the U.S. provides visa services to the general public in each other’s countries; U.S. visitors to Libya should therefore plan to obtain a visa via a third country. Libyan visas require an invitation or sponsor, can take up to several months to process, and should be obtained prior to travel. All visas are vetted and approved by immigration departments in Tripoli and only issued by the appropriate Libyan Embassy upon receipt of that approval. There may be another wait for actual visa issuance once approval has been received. For tourists, the visa application procedure in most cases requires a letter of invitation from an accredited tour company in Libya; for business travelers, a letter of invitation is needed from the Libyan business entity. Americans who apply for Libyan visas are experiencing significant delays, often waiting several weeks or months if their applications are approved at all. Inconsistent Libyan visa practice is subject to change without notice and visa service to American citizens is often blocked without warning. With few exceptions, Libya has stopped issuing tourist visas to Americans. It is recommended that Americans always obtain individual Libyan visas prior to travel, rather than group visas. Americans who expected to enter on group tour visas or individual airport visas arranged by Libyan sponsors have routinely been denied entry at the air and sea ports and have been forced to turn back at the airport or remain onboard ship at the port while other nationals disembark. The U.S. Embassy in Tripoli cannot provide assistance to American citizens seeking Libyan visas.

    Inquiries about obtaining a Libyan visa may be made through the Libyan Embassy in Washington, D.C. The Embassy is located at 2600 Virginia Avenue NW – Suite 705, Washington, DC 20037, phone number 202-944-9601, fax number 202-944-9606, website www.libyanbureau-dc.org. Neither the Libyan Mission to the UN in New York nor the Libyan Embassy in Washington, DC accepts visa applications from the general public. The closest Libyan visa-issuing office to the continental United States is the Libyan People’s Bureau in Ottawa, Canada; however, that office frequently declines to accept visa applications from American citizens. The land borders with Egypt and Tunisia are subject to periodic closures even to travelers with valid Libyan visas. Short-term closures of other land borders may occur with little notice. Within three days of arrival, visitors must register at the police station closest to where they are residing or they may encounter problems during their stay or upon departure.

    Women and children in Libya are often subject to strict family controls.  This can be a particular problem for young single women of marriageable age. Although a woman does not need her father’s or husband's explicit consent every time she wishes to leave Libya, a Libyan husband may take legal action to prevent his wife from leaving the country, regardless of her nationality. While not illegal, it is unusual for women and children to travel alone. Children under 18 whose fathers are Libyan must have the father's permission to depart Libya, even if the mother has been granted full custody by a Libyan court.

    The Libyan Government requires all its citizens, including dual nationals of Libyan descent, to enter and depart Libya on Libyan documents. In some cases American citizens of Libyan descent have entered Libya on old or expired Libyan identity document and then discovered that they cannot depart Libya without obtaining a valid Libyan passport, which can be a cumbersome process.

    Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site.  For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.

    [8] 

    Power

    Voltage Frequency Power Plug
    127 V
    50 Hz
    Type D:

    References


    Last Update: 2009-12-03 00:48+01:00
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