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Bangkok

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Wat Arun at night
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Distance 26.3km
Technical Data[Edit]
Geo Position 13.75, 100.5166667
Population 5104476
Time Zone UTC/GMT +7.00
AltitudeSetup Travel112 ~ 2 m
External Links[Edit]
Official Website
www.bma.go.th
Travel Guide
www.lonelyplanet.com
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en.wikipedia.org
capital of a political entity

Bangkok

Local Time: Setup Travel112Helptext

News and Warnings

Safety: Thailand

Publisher: U.S. Department of StateSetup Travel112Helptext
Last Update: 2009-11-04
Safety and Security
The State Department is concerned that there is a continuted risk of terrorism in Southeast Asia, including in Thailand. U.S. citizens traveling to Thailand should therefore exercise caution, especially in locations where Westerners congregate, such as clubs, discos, bars, restaurants, hotels, places of worship, schools, outdoor recreation venues, tourist areas, beach resorts, and other places frequented by foreigners. They should remain vigilant with regard to their personal security and avoid crowds and demonstrations. For more information on terrorist threats against U.S. citizens worldwide and steps to take as a result of these threats, please see the Worldwide Caution.

From May 2008 - April 2009, political protests on the streets of Bangkok involving anti-government and pro-government demonstrators led to the death of eight Thai citizens and injuries to over 700, including a U.S. citizen who was injured by an exploding tear gas canister, and an additional death in Chiang Mai. Most of the casualties occurred around the Government House compound and the two Bangkok airports, Suvarnabhumi International Airport and Don Muang Airport, which were temporarily occupied by the People's Alliance for Democracy (PAD). Thailand experienced similar demonstrations, primarily in Bangkok and Chiang Mai, during the political unrest that led to a military coup in September 2006.

The Department of State advises all U.S. citizens residing in or traveling to Bangkok to monitor events closely, to avoid any large public gatherings, and to exercise discretion when moving about Bangkok. All demonstrations are unpredictable, and any demonstration can turn violent without warning. For this reason, the Embassy encourages all U.S. citizens to monitor local media for announcements of possible demonstrations and to avoid the areas where demonstrations might occur. If a demonstration is expected to pass near U.S. Embassy facilities, Embassy entrances and functions may be restricted, depending on circumstances.

The far south of Thailand has been experiencing almost daily incidents of criminally and politically motivated violence, including incidents attributed to armed local separatist groups. On March 15, 2008, two bombs exploded at the CS Pattani Hotel in Pattani Province in southern Thailand. Two people died and thirteen were injured. A car bomb exploded in Yala Province on the same day, killing the driver. Although the separatist groups have continued to focus primarily on Thai government interests in the southern provinces, some of the recent violence in the area has targeted public places, including areas where tourists may congregate. On September 17, 2006, a series of bombs detonated in a commercial district of Hat Yai, killing one U.S. citizen and injuring another. In 2005 two U.S. citizens were injured when a bomb detonated in the Hat Yai airport. Attacks in the area have increasingly been targeted against commercial areas where foreigners congregate. The U.S. Embassy prohibits U.S. Embassy personnel from traveling to the far south of Thailand - Narathiwat, Pattani, Yala, and Songkhla provinces, including the town of Hat Yai - without prior mission approval, and Embassy personnel may travel there only on mission-essential travel.  The Department of State urges U.S. citizens to defer non-emergency travel to these areas. If U.S. citizens must travel to these areas, they should exercise special caution and remain vigilant with regard to their personal security. Travelers should be aware that Thai authorities have on occasion instituted special security measures in affected areas, such as curfews, military patrols, or random searches of train passengers.

The U.S. Embassy recommends that U.S. citizens defer travel along the Thai-Cambodian border in the area of the Preah Vihear temple because of a border dispute between the two countries. Thai and Cambodian soldiers have been stationed along the border in this area since July 2008 and have exchanged gunfire on several occasions. Until the situation has been resolved, U.S. citizens should exercise extreme caution if they must travel to areas along the Thai-Cambodian border where troop activities are reported.

From 2004 to 2006, seven Lao-American and Hmong-American citizens were murdered in northern and northeastern Thailand near the border with Laos. During the same period, a number of non-U.S. citizens with ties to Laos were also murdered in this region of Thailand. In addition, in March 2006 a Hmong-American disappeared from his residence in Chiang Mai along with seven other individuals. In most of these cases, no arrests have been made. If U.S. citizens, particularly Lao-Americans or Hmong-Americans, travel to these areas, they should exercise caution and remain vigilant with regard to their personal security. It is also recommended that persons wishing to travel to border areas check first with the Thai Police and the U.S. Consulate General in Chiang Mai, the U.S. Embassy in Bangkok, or the U.S. Embassy in Vientiane as appropriate.

The Thai/Burma border is the site of on-going conflicts between the Burmese Army and armed opposition groups as well as clashes between Thai security forces and armed drug traffickers. Pirates, bandits, and drug traffickers operate in these border areas. There remains a possibility of significant flare-ups of military activity on the Burmese side of the border that could spill over into immediately adjacent areas of northern Thailand. Visitors should travel off-road in undeveloped areas only with local guides who are familiar with the area. Border closings and re-openings occur frequently, and U.S. citizens considering traveling into Burma from Thailand should be aware that in the event of a border closure they may not be able to re-enter Thailand. In light of the continuing unsettled situation along the Thai border with Burma and the possibility of frequent closings to all traffic, the Department of State recommends that all U.S. citizens exercise caution when traveling in remote or rural areas immediately adjacent to the Burma border.

Tourists should obtain information from Thai authorities about whether official border crossing points are open, and should cross into neighboring countries only at designated crossing points. Licensed guides can help ensure that trekkers do not cross inadvertently into a neighboring country.

For the latest security information, U.S. citizens traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs' website, which contains current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts as well as the Worldwide Caution.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free within the U.S. and Canada, or by calling a regular toll line, 1-202-501-4444, from other countries. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges U.S. citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State's extensive tips and advice on traveling safely abroad.

Crime
Although the crime threat in Bangkok remains lower than that in many U.S. cities, crimes of opportunity such as pick-pocketing, purse-snatching, and burglary have become more common in recent years. Travelers should be especially wary when walking in crowded markets, tourist sites, and bus or train stations. Many U.S. citizens have reported having passports, wallets, and other valuables stolen in Bangkok's Chatuchak Weekend Market, usually by thieves who cut into purses or bags with a razor and remove items surreptitiously. Police at the Market usually refuse to issue police reports for foreign victims of theft, requiring them instead to travel several miles to the central Tourist Police office. Violent crimes against foreigners are relatively rare. However, there has been a recent upsurge in violent crime against tourists, including the murder of several independent travelers, on the southern islands of Phuket and Koh Samui. Independent travelers should exercise caution and stay in the vicinity of other travelers, especially in the beach areas of these islands.

Reports of serious crimes involving taxis or "tuk-tuks" (three-wheeled taxis) are also relatively rare, although attempts to charge excessive fares occur regularly. Several taxi-related incidents involving foreign passengers occur in Bangkok each year. U.S. citizens should not hesitate to ask to be let out of a taxi immediately if the driver is acting suspiciously or driving erratically. (See also the Safety and Road Conditions section.)

When arriving at Bangkok's airport, travelers should use only taxis from the airport's official taxi stand, cars from the airport limousine counters, or airport buses. All major hotels in Bangkok can also arrange to have a car and driver meet incoming flights. It is uncommon for Thai taxis to pick up additional passengers. Travelers should be wary of drivers seeking to do so and should never enter a cab that has someone besides the driver in it.

U.S. citizens frequently encounter taxi drivers and others who tout gem stores or entertainment venues. These touts receive kickbacks or commissions that drive up the prices of the goods or services, and travelers should not accept tours or other offers from them. Scams involving gems, city tours, entertainment venues, and credit cards are common, especially in areas heavily visited by tourists. Credit cards should be used only in reputable, established businesses, and the amount charged should be checked for accuracy.

The Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) receives over a thousand complaints each year from visitors who have been cheated on gem purchases. Gem scams usually follow a predictable pattern. Someone approaches a tourist outside of a well-known tourist attraction such as the Grand Palace or the Jim Thompson House and says that the attraction is closed. The friendly stranger quickly gains the tourist's confidence and suggests a visit to a temple that is supposedly open only one day per year; the stranger then mentions in passing that a special once-a-year government-sponsored gem sale is going on and directs the tourist to a waiting tuk-tuk. At the temple, another stranger - sometimes a foreigner - engages the tourist in conversation and, by seeming coincidence, also mentions the "special" gem sale. The tourist agrees to go look at the gem shop and is soon convinced to buy thousands of dollars worth of jewels that can supposedly be sold in the U.S. for a 100% profit. When the tourist actually has the goods appraised, they turn out to be of minimal value, and the shop's money-back guarantee is not honored. No matter what a tout may say, no jewelry stores are owned, operated, or sponsored by the Thai Government or by the Thai royal family. Lists of gem dealers who have promised to abide by TAT guidelines are available online from the Buying Gems & Jewellery in Thailand section of the Tourism Authority of Thailand's website and detailed information on gem scams can be found on numerous web sites. A traveler who has fallen victim to a gem scam should contact the local branch of the Tourist Police or call their country-wide toll-free number: 1155.

Although most bars and entertainment venues operate honestly, some, especially in tourist areas such as Patpong, at times try to charge exorbitant amounts for drinks or unadvertised cover charges and threaten violence if the charges are not paid. If victimized in this fashion, travelers should not attempt to resolve the problem themselves but should instead pay the price demanded and then seek out a nearby Tourist Police officer for help in getting restitution. (If no officer is nearby, the Tourist Police may be contacted toll-free by dialing 1155.)

There have been occasional reports of scopolamine drugging perpetrated by prostitutes or unscrupulous bar workers for the purpose of robbery. (Scopolamine is a powerful sedative.) Tourists have also been victimized by drugged food and drink, usually offered by a friendly stranger, sometimes posing as a fellow traveler on an overnight bus or train. In addition, casual acquaintances met in a bar or on the street may pose a threat. Travelers are advised to avoid leaving drinks or food unattended and should avoid going alone to unfamiliar venues. Some trekking tour companies, particularly in Northern Thailand, have been known to make drugs available to trekkers. Travelers should not accept drugs of any kind, as the drugs may be altered or harmful, and the use or sale of narcotic drugs is illegal in Thailand.

Pirated Merchandise: Counterfeit and pirated goods are widely available in Thailand. The manufacture and sale of pirated goods, including music, movies, software, and counterfeit luxury goods and apparel, is a crime in Thailand and is frequently controlled by organized crime networks. In addition, bringing these goods back to the United States may result in forfeitures and/or fines. More information on this serious problem is available in the intellectual property section of the U.S. Department of Justice website.

[1] 

HIV: Thailand

Prevalence of HIV among adults aged >=15 years1.144%

Emergency

Telephone Numbers

Police Fire Brigade Ambulance Mobile Phone (GSM)
1669 199 191 112

Embassies and Consulates

Attention: As a citizen of the European Union, you can use the embassies and consulates of the other member states as well. You will find the list of represented EU states on our webpage Embassies and Consulates.


Foreign CountriesSetup Travel112 => Bangkok
Entries: 4

Card Service

Company
American Express Diners Club MasterCard Visa Discover EC/Maestro JCB

Money Transfer

Western Union[2]
BANK OF AYUDHYA, 1150 PHATTHANAKAN ROAD
UNITED OVERSEAS BANK THAI PCL, 127/1 NONSEE ROAD,RATCHADA-SATHUPRADIT
BANK OF AYUDHYA, RIVER CITY SHOPPING COMPLEXMap
THAILAND POST, INSIDE ASSUMPTION UNIVERSITY 682 SOI RAMMap
SIAM CITY BANK, 4/1399-1402 SUKHAPHIBAL 1 ROAD
BANK OF AYUDHYA, 110 PHET KASEM ROAD
SIAM CITY BANK PLC, 88 SOL TWIN TOWERS HOTEL-RONGMUANG ROADMap
SIAM CITY BANK, 601 4-5 RAMKAMHAENG SOI 39, PRACHA UTIS ROAD.
BANK OF AYUDHYA, 992 10-11 PHRAN NOK ROAD
UNITED OVERSEAS BANK THAI PCL, 325/168 LUKLUANG ROAD ,SAPHAN KHAO
SIAM CITY BANK PLC, 202 LE CONCORD BUILDING
UNITED OVERSEAS BANK THAI PCL, 131 MU 6, SRI NAKHARIN ROAD
SIAM CITY BANK, DUSIT PLACE-SUKHOTHAI ROAD
SIAM CITY BANK, 88,90 JAKPHET RD
THAILAND POST, 3420-22 SUKHUMVIT RD
SIAM CITY BANK, BANG KHUN NON SUB-BRANCH
SIAM CITY BANK, 259-265 CHAROENKRUNG ROAD
UNITED OVERSEAS BANK THAI PCL, 72/65-68 MU 6, EAKCHAI - BANGBON ROAD
BANK OF AYUDHYA, 105 457-460 SUKHA PHIBAN 1 RD.
BANK OF AYUDHYA, NARAIBHAN PAVILLIAN BDG.RACHDAMRI RD
SIAM CITY BANK, SAMYARN BRANCH
THAILAND POST, 1ST FL PARKING BLDG MINISTRY OF JUSTICE
BANK OF AYUDHYA, 360-362 THA DIN DAENG ROAD
BANK OF AYUDHYA, 7 2-3 KRUNGTHEP-NONTHABURI ROAD
BANK OF AYUDHYA, 2108 CHAROEN KRUNG ROAD
SIAM CITY BANK, 61 48-9 CHAMNAN PENCHART BUSINESS CENTER, RAMA IX ROAD
THAILAND POST, 74 MOO 3 SOI KLONGCHAN SERITHAI RD
BANK OF AYUDHYA PLC, 31/17 MOO 13 RATCHAPHRUEK ROAD
UNITED OVERSEAS BANK THAI PCL, 1249/19/50/59 JEMS TOWER, CHAROEN KRUNG ROAD
THAILAND POST, KONTI BUILDING RAMKAMHAENG UNIVERISTY BMap
THAILAND POST, 116 3-4 SATHUPRADIT RD BANGPONGPANG
BANK OF AYUDHYA, 3522 LADPRAO ROAD
BANK OF AYUDHYA, 6 15-16 SUKHA PHIBAN 1 ROAD

WeatherSetup Travel112

UV Index

Today's maximum values:

UV
Index
08:0009:0010:0011:0012:0013:0014:0015:0016:0017:00
03061011+11+11+10060302
3.35.89.513.014.513.09.55.83.32.0


Average Values


Transport

Airports

Airport IATA ICAO Distance
Don Mueang International Airport DMK VTBD 21 km
Suvarnabhumi BKK VTBS 26 km

Railway Companies

Railway Companies Website
SRT State Railway of Thailand

Railway Stations

Railway Stations Distance
Sathani Sam Sen 2.6 km
Bang Bua Thong Railway Station 2.6 km
Sathani Makkasan 3.6 km
Tachin Railway Station 4.1 km
Sathani Thon Buri 4 km
Sathani Mae Nam 5.2 km
Sathani Talat Phlu 5.2 km
Sathani Bang Bamru 5.2 km
Sathani Bang Ramat 6.5 km
Sathani Bang Su 6.6 km

Health

Health Information: Thailand

Publisher: U.S.A., Centers for Disease Control and PreventionSetup Travel112Helptext
Last Update: 2009-11-04

    Before visiting Thailand, you may need to get the following vaccinations and medications for vaccine-preventable diseases and other diseases you might be at risk for at your destination: (Note: Your doctor or health-care provider will determine what you will need, depending on factors such as your health and immunization history, areas of the country you will be visiting, and planned activities.)

    To have the most benefit, see a health-care provider at least 4–6 weeks before your trip to allow time for your vaccines to take effect and to start taking medicine to prevent malaria, if you need it.

    Even if you have less than 4 weeks before you leave, you should still see a health-care provider for needed vaccines, anti-malaria drugs and other medications and information about how to protect yourself from illness and injury while traveling.

    CDC recommends that you see a health-care provider who specializes in Travel Medicine.  Find a travel medicine clinic near you. If you have a medical condition, you should also share your travel plans with any doctors you are currently seeing for other medical reasons.

    If your travel plans will take you to more than one country during a single trip, be sure to let your health-care provider know so that you can receive the appropriate vaccinations and information for all of your destinations. Long-term travelers, such as those who plan to work or study abroad, may also need additional vaccinations as required by their employer or school.

    Although yellow fever is not a disease risk in Thailand, the government requires travelers arriving from countries where yellow fever is present to present proof of yellow fever vaccination. If you will be traveling to one of these countries where yellow fever is present before arriving in Thailand, this requirement must be taken into consideration.

    Be sure your routine vaccinations are up-to-date. Check the links below to see which vaccinations adults and children should get.

    Routine vaccines, as they are often called, such as for influenza, chickenpox (or varicella), polio, measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), and diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT) are given at all stages of life; see the childhood and adolescent immunization schedule and routine adult immunization schedule.

    Routine vaccines are recommended even if you do not travel. Although childhood diseases, such as measles, rarely occur in the United States, they are still common in many parts of the world. A traveler who is not vaccinated would be at risk for infection.

    [3] 

    Health Factors: Thailand[4] 

    Description
    Water Access to improved drinking water sources: rural 97%
    Access to improved drinking water sources: urban 99%
    Sanitation Access to improved sanitation: rural 96%
    Access to improved sanitation: urban 95%
    Health Prevalence of HIV among adults aged >=15 years 1.144%
    Physicians density (per 10 000 population) 4.0
    Life expectancy at birth (years) female 75
    Life expectancy at birth (years) male 69

    Hospitals

    Hospital Distance
    Sirirat Hospital 3.6 km
    Rong Phayaban Wachira 5.6 km

    Natural Disaster

    Earthquake

    The GSHAP Global Seismic Hazard Map
    This GSHAP map depicts the likely level of short-period ground motion from earthquakes in a fifty-year window. The map colors chosen to delineate the hazard roughly correspond to the actual level of the hazard. The cooler colors represent lower hazard while the warmer colors represent higher hazard. Specifically, white and green correspond to low hazard (0 - 8% g, where g equals the acceleration of gravity); yellow and orange correspond to moderate hazard (8 - 24% g); pink and red correspond to high hazard (24 - 40% g); and dark red and brown correspond to very high hazard ( ? 40% g).[5] 


    Earthquake: Bangkok

    GSHAP[6]

    Travel Preparation

    Power

    Voltage Frequency Power Plug
    220 V
    50 Hz
    Type A:
    Type C:

    References


    Last Update: 2009-12-03 00:48+01:00
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