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Peking, Forbidden City
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Technical Data[Edit]
Capital Beijing
Political Structure 31 Entities
Population 1330044000
Urban Population 42%
Population Growth 0.6%
Income per Capita 4660$ / Year
Below Poverty Line 9.9% (< US$1 / Day)
Literacy Rate 90.9%
Languages Chinese
AreaSetup Travel112 9596960 km²
Time Zone UTC/GMT +8.00
AltitudeSetup Travel112 ~ 1993 m
Currency CNY (Yuan Renminbi)
Country Code CN
Neighbours LA, BT, TJ, KZ, MN, AF, NP, MM, KG, PK, KP, RU, VN, IN
Vehicle Registration Code CHN
Top-Level Domain .cn
External Links[Edit]
Government
english.gov.cn
Ministry for Foreign Affairs
www.fmprc.gov.cn
Travel Guide
www.lonelyplanet.com
Encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org
independent political entity

People's Republic of China

Local Time: Setup Travel112Helptext

News and Warnings

Safety

Publisher: U.S. Department of StateSetup Travel112Helptext
Last Update: 2009-12-31
>>Please apologize, but we havn't found any information on the publisher's website<<
[1] 

Emergency

Telephone Numbers

Police Fire Brigade Ambulance Mobile Phone (GSM)
120 119 110 112

Embassies and Consulates

Attention: As a citizen of the European Union, you can use the embassies and consulates of the other member states as well. You will find the list of represented EU states on our webpage Embassies and Consulates.


People's Republic of China => Foreign CountriesSetup Travel112
Entries: 0
Foreign CountriesSetup Travel112 => People's Republic of China
Entries: 14

Card Service

Company
American Express MasterCard Visa Diners Club Discover EC/Maestro JCB

Money Transfer

Western Union[2]  and other companies are offering a worldwide service, to send money to friends or relatives within minutes to nearly every location in the world. Per location the stored agents will be shown. You can find the agents on the map also, as long a road map is available.
Alternatively you can send money online also, but this service is only from some countries[3]  available.


WeatherSetup Travel112


Average Values



Transport

Traffic Rules

Right-Hand Traffic
If right-hand-traffic is unusal for you, take time and make breaks to become used to. Always bear in mind that you have to drive on the right side!
Speed Limits
  Town Highway Motorway
30-60 kph
60-80 kph
100-120 kph
30-60 kph
60-80 kph
100-120 kph
 
Right-Hand Traffic
Right-Hand Traffic

Evaluated National Airlines

Stars Airline IATA ICAO
 Star Airline Air China
 Star Airline China Southern Airlines
 Star Airline Hainan Airlines
 Star Airline Shanghai Airlines
 Star Airline China Eastern Airlines
 Star Airline Shenzhen Airlines
 Star Airline Spring Airlines

Health

Health Information

Publisher: U.S.A., Centers for Disease Control and PreventionSetup Travel112Helptext
Last Update: 2009-12-31

    Before visiting China, you may need to get the following vaccinations and medications for vaccine-preventable diseases and other diseases you might be at risk for at your destination: (Note: Your doctor or health-care provider will determine what you will need, depending on factors such as your health and immunization history, areas of the country you will be visiting, and planned activities.)

    To have the most benefit, see a health-care provider at least 4–6 weeks before your trip to allow time for your vaccines to take effect and to start taking medicine to prevent malaria, if you need it.

    Even if you have less than 4 weeks before you leave, you should still see a health-care provider for needed vaccines, anti-malaria drugs and other medications and information about how to protect yourself from illness and injury while traveling.

    CDC recommends that you see a health-care provider who specializes in Travel Medicine.  Find a travel medicine clinic near you. If you have a medical condition, you should also share your travel plans with any doctors you are currently seeing for other medical reasons.

    If your travel plans will take you to more than one country during a single trip, be sure to let your health-care provider know so that you can receive the appropriate vaccinations and information for all of your destinations. Long-term travelers, such as those who plan to work or study abroad, may also need additional vaccinations as required by their employer or school.

    Although yellow fever is not a disease risk in China, the government requires travelers arriving from countries where yellow fever is present to present proof of yellow fever vaccination. If you will be traveling to one of these countries where yellow fever is present before arriving in China, this requirement must be taken into consideration.

    Be sure your routine vaccinations are up-to-date. Check the links below to see which vaccinations adults and children should get.

    Routine vaccines, as they are often called, such as for influenza, chickenpox (or varicella), polio, measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), and diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT) are given at all stages of life; see the childhood and adolescent immunization schedule and routine adult immunization schedule.

    Routine vaccines are recommended even if you do not travel. Although childhood diseases, such as measles, rarely occur in the United States, they are still common in many parts of the world. A traveler who is not vaccinated would be at risk for infection.

    [4] 

    Health Factors[5] 

    Description
    Water Access to improved drinking water sources: rural 81%
    Access to improved drinking water sources: urban 98%
    Sanitation Access to improved sanitation: rural 59%
    Access to improved sanitation: urban 74%
    Health Prevalence of HIV among adults aged >=15 years 0.062%
    Physicians density (per 10 000 population) 14.0
    Hospital beds (per 10 000 population) 22
    Life expectancy at birth (years) female 75
    Life expectancy at birth (years) male 72

    Natural Disaster

    Active Volcanoes

    Even if some volcanoes are not active today, we have to aware that given to their long livespan - most of them are only dormant. Nevertheless scientists are defining a volcano as extinct if it is not considered likely that he will erupt in the future.

    People's Republic of China shows volcanic activity in some areas and their are written records (Quantity: 1) of volcanic eruptions.
    more...

     
    Active Volcanoes: Mount Rinjani
    Volcano[6]

    Earthquake

    In the last 200 years significant earthquakes (Quantity: 279) have occurred in People's Republic of China.
    more...

    The GSHAP Global Seismic Hazard Map
    This GSHAP map depicts the likely level of short-period ground motion from earthquakes in a fifty-year window. The map colors chosen to delineate the hazard roughly correspond to the actual level of the hazard. The cooler colors represent lower hazard while the warmer colors represent higher hazard. Specifically, white and green correspond to low hazard (0 - 8% g, where g equals the acceleration of gravity); yellow and orange correspond to moderate hazard (8 - 24% g); pink and red correspond to high hazard (24 - 40% g); and dark red and brown correspond to very high hazard ( ? 40% g).[7] 


    Earthquake: People\'s Republic of China

    GSHAP[8]

    Tsunami Runup Areas

    All coastal zones are endangered by tsunamis. They are mostly generated by strong earthquake or volcanic eruptions. But it is also possible that massive landslides or meteorites can cause a tsunami when they contact water. It's a precondition that the impact displaces vertically the surface of the ocean or other body of water.

    During the last 100 years coastal zones of People's Republic of China were affected by tsunamis. Their are specific reports (Quantity: 12) about tsunami runup areas.
    more...

     
    Tsunami Warning
    Tsunami Warning

    Travel Preparation

    Entry and Exit Requirements

    Publisher: U.S. Department of StateSetup Travel112Helptext
    Last Update: 2009-12-31
      A valid passport and visa are required to enter and exit China and must be obtained from Chinese Embassies and Consulates before traveling to China.  Americans arriving without valid passports and the appropriate Chinese visa are not permitted to enter and will be subject to a fine and immediate deportation at the traveler's expense.  Travelers should not rely on Chinese host organizations claiming to be able to arrange a visa upon arrival.  Chinese authorities have recently tightened their visa issuance policy, in some cases requiring personal interviews of American citizens.  Although a bilateral United States-China agreement provides for issuance of multiple-entry visas with validity of up to one year for tourists and business visitors, Chinese consulates often limit visas to only one entry.   Visit the Embassy of China web site for the most current visa information.

    Visas are not required of aliens who hold air tickets to the final destination, have booked seats on international airliners flying directly through China, and will stay in a transit city for less than 24 hours without leaving the airport. Persons transiting China on the way to and from Mongolia or North Korea or who plan to re-enter China from the Hong Kong or Macau Special Administrative Regions should be sure to obtain visas allowing more than one entry.  Permits are required to visit Tibet as well as many remote areas not normally open to foreigners.  A travel permit for Tibet can be obtained through local travel agents. Permits cost approximately renminbi (RMB) 100, are single-entry and valid for at most three months.  Most areas in Tibet are not open for foreigners except Lhasa City and part of Shan Nan.  Foreigners can be fined up to RMB 500, taken into custody, and deported for visiting restricted areas.  For information about entry requirements and restricted areas, travelers may consult the Visa Office of the Embassy of China (PRC) at Room 110, 2201 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Washington DC 20007, or telephone (202) 338-6688 and (202) 588-9760. For a list of services and frequently asked visa questions and answers, travelers can view the Chinese Embassy's web site. There are Chinese consulates general in Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco. Since the run-up to the Olympics, some Americans have reported having difficulty getting visas in Seoul, South Korea or Hong Kong. 

    In July 2007, the Chinese government tightened its regulations for altering or renewing visas for individuals already in China.  Visitors can no longer change tourist (L) and exchange (F) -type visas to other types and many applications must now be completed in person.  There have also been reports that entry and exit violations are being more strictly enforced, with recent reports of police, school administrators and hotel staff checking to ensure that individuals have not overstayed their visas.  Visitors are expected to register with the police within 24 hours of arrival in China.  While hotels generally do this automatically with no additional action being required from the guest, Americans planning on staying in private homes with family or friends must go to their local police station to register.  The police have been stricter in the enforcement of this rule and have fined apartment companies, hotels and Americans for violations.

    Americans who overstay or otherwise violate the terms of their Chinese visas will be subject to a maximum fine of 5,000 RMB, departure delays and may be subject to detention.  Travelers should note that international flights departing China are routinely overbooked, making reconfirmation of departure reservations and early airport check-in essential.  An airport user fee for both international and domestic flights is now included in the cost of the ticket price.  Americans are also required to have an exit visa to leave China.  Americans who lose a passport must take into consideration the time needed to get a new passport and a new visa.  Visa issuances can take as long as 7 business days.

    In an effort to prevent international child abduction, many governments have initiated new procedures at entry/ exit points.  These often include requiring documentary evidence of relationship and permission for the child’s travel from the parent(s) or legal guardian if they are not present.  Having such documentation on hand, even if not required, may facilitate entry/departure.

    Dual national Americans, particularly those with dual Chinese and American nationality, should realize that entering China using their non-U.S. passport could mean that the Chinese Government may not afford them the consular protections to which they are entitled.  While the U.S. Government will offer consular services to all U.S. citizens regardless of dual nationality, use of other than a U.S. passport to enter China can make it difficult for U.S. Consuls to assist dual national Americans who have been arrested or who have other concerns with the Chinese Government.

    China does not recognize dual citizenship.  U.S. Embassy and Consulate officials are often denied access to arrested or detained Americans who do not enter China using their U.S. passport.  Lawful Permanent Residents of the United States who do not carry unexpired or otherwise clear evidence that they may re-enter the United States will encounter delays departing from China.  Lawful Permanent Residents should renew and update U.S. residence documentation prior to their departure from the United States.

    Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our website.  For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information Sheet.

      A valid passport and visa are required to enter and exit China and must be obtained from Chinese Embassies and Consulates before traveling to China.  Americans arriving without valid passports and the appropriate Chinese visa are not permitted to enter and will be subject to a fine and immediate deportation at the traveler's expense.  Travelers should not rely on Chinese host organizations claiming to be able to arrange a visa upon arrival.  Chinese authorities have recently tightened their visa issuance policy, in some cases requiring personal interviews of American citizens.  Although a bilateral United States-China agreement provides for issuance of multiple-entry visas with validity of up to one year for tourists and business visitors, Chinese consulates often limit visas to only one entry.   Visit the Embassy of China web site for the most current visa information.

    Visas are not required of aliens who hold air tickets to the final destination, have booked seats on international airliners flying directly through China, and will stay in a transit city for less than 24 hours without leaving the airport. Persons transiting China on the way to and from Mongolia or North Korea or who plan to re-enter China from the Hong Kong or Macau Special Administrative Regions should be sure to obtain visas allowing more than one entry.  Permits are required to visit Tibet as well as many remote areas not normally open to foreigners.  A travel permit for Tibet can be obtained through local travel agents. Permits cost approximately renminbi (RMB) 100, are single-entry and valid for at most three months.  Most areas in Tibet are not open for foreigners except Lhasa City and part of Shan Nan.  Foreigners can be fined up to RMB 500, taken into custody, and deported for visiting restricted areas.  For information about entry requirements and restricted areas, travelers may consult the Visa Office of the Embassy of China (PRC) at Room 110, 2201 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Washington DC 20007, or telephone (202) 338-6688 and (202) 588-9760. For a list of services and frequently asked visa questions and answers, travelers can view the Chinese Embassy's web site. There are Chinese consulates general in Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco. Since the run-up to the Olympics, some Americans have reported having difficulty getting visas in Seoul, South Korea or Hong Kong. 

    In July 2007, the Chinese government tightened its regulations for altering or renewing visas for individuals already in China.  Visitors can no longer change tourist (L) and exchange (F) -type visas to other types and many applications must now be completed in person.  There have also been reports that entry and exit violations are being more strictly enforced, with recent reports of police, school administrators and hotel staff checking to ensure that individuals have not overstayed their visas.  Visitors are expected to register with the police within 24 hours of arrival in China.  While hotels generally do this automatically with no additional action being required from the guest, Americans planning on staying in private homes with family or friends must go to their local police station to register.  The police have been stricter in the enforcement of this rule and have fined apartment companies, hotels and Americans for violations.

    Americans who overstay or otherwise violate the terms of their Chinese visas will be subject to a maximum fine of 5,000 RMB, departure delays and may be subject to detention.  Travelers should note that international flights departing China are routinely overbooked, making reconfirmation of departure reservations and early airport check-in essential.  An airport user fee for both international and domestic flights is now included in the cost of the ticket price.  Americans are also required to have an exit visa to leave China.  Americans who lose a passport must take into consideration the time needed to get a new passport and a new visa.  Visa issuances can take as long as 7 business days.

    In an effort to prevent international child abduction, many governments have initiated new procedures at entry/ exit points.  These often include requiring documentary evidence of relationship and permission for the child’s travel from the parent(s) or legal guardian if they are not present.  Having such documentation on hand, even if not required, may facilitate entry/departure.

    Dual national Americans, particularly those with dual Chinese and American nationality, should realize that entering China using their non-U.S. passport could mean that the Chinese Government may not afford them the consular protections to which they are entitled.  While the U.S. Government will offer consular services to all U.S. citizens regardless of dual nationality, use of other than a U.S. passport to enter China can make it difficult for U.S. Consuls to assist dual national Americans who have been arrested or who have other concerns with the Chinese Government.

    China does not recognize dual citizenship.  U.S. Embassy and Consulate officials are often denied access to arrested or detained Americans who do not enter China using their U.S. passport.  Lawful Permanent Residents of the United States who do not carry unexpired or otherwise clear evidence that they may re-enter the United States will encounter delays departing from China.  Lawful Permanent Residents should renew and update U.S. residence documentation prior to their departure from the United States.

    Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our website.  For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information Sheet.

    [9] 

    Power

    Voltage Frequency Power Plug
    220 V
    50 Hz
    Type A:
    Type I:
    Type teilw.G:

    References


    Last Update: 2009-12-03 00:48+01:00
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